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Tuesday, August 7 • 9:20am - 9:40am
Population Estimation 2 Track: A Synopsis of an 8 Year Evaluation of a Population of Mule Deer (Odocoileus hemionus) on the Mojave National Preserve, California USA.

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AUTHORS: Levi J. Heffelfinger, Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Science, University of Nevada Reno; Kelley M. Stewart, Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Science, University of Nevada Reno; Anthony P. Bush, Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Science, University of Nevada Reno; Cody J. McKee, Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Science, University of Nevada Reno; Neal W. Darby, Mojave National Preserve, National Park Service; Vernon C. Bleich, Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Science, University of Nevada Reno

ABSTRACT: The changing climate will likely have strong effects on arid environments as a result of increased temperatures, increasing frequency and intensity of droughts, and less consistent pulses of rainfall [1]. Understanding the link between the environment and population performance of species occupying these environments will continue to increase in importance as climatic shifts occur within these natural ecosystems. We captured and radio-collared 198 adult female and 110 juvenile mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) from 2008 – 2016 throughout 3 study sites on the Mojave National Preserve, California USA. We evaluated how environmental conditions and habitat characteristics affected seasonal resource selection, adult survival, and juvenile recruitment. We also sought to test how the access to perennial, manmade water sources affected adult body condition and reproductive output. Lastly, we then focused on the reproductive timeframe of adult females and assessed parturition site selection and tradeoffs associated with the reproductive timeframes. Adult mule deer exhibited smaller home ranges in the study site with a higher density of permanent water sources (95% KDE= 1005ha versus 1610ha and 1960ha) and selected areas closer to water sources regardless of season and site (P=

466839 pdf
920AM pdf

Tuesday August 7, 2018 9:20am - 9:40am
Long Peaks Lodge - Diamond E&W
  • Slides Available Yes

Attendees (3)