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Monday, August 6 • 4:30pm - Friday, August 10 •12:00pm
Poster: INCYDEN Project: Technology in Support of a Non-Asian Industry of Velvet and Other Deer Products for Traditional Chinese Medicine and Western Nutraceutics

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AUTHORS: Javier Perez-Barberia, Sec. Recursos Cinegéticos y Ganaderos, IDR, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha and Animal Science Techniques Applied to Wildlife Management Research Group, Instituto Investigación en Recursos Cinegéticos (IREC), Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha; Andrés J. Garcia, Sec. Recursos Cinegéticos y Ganaderos, IDR, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha and Animal Science Techniques Applied to Wildlife Management Research Group, Instituto Investigación en Recursos Cinegéticos (IREC), Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha; Pilar Lopez-Garrido, Sec. Recursos Cinegéticos y Ganaderos, IDR, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha; Jose Manuel Lorenzo, Centro Tecnológico de la Carne (CETECA); Martina Perez-Serrano, Sec. Recursos Cinegéticos y Ganaderos, IDR, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha and Animal Science Techniques Applied to Wildlife Management Research Group, Instituto Investigación en Recursos Cinegéticos (IREC), Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha; Jamil Cappelli, Sec. Recursos Cinegéticos y Ganaderos, IDR, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha and Animal Science Techniques Applied to Wildlife Management Research Group, Instituto Investigación en Recursos Cinegéticos (IREC), Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha; Laureano Gallego, Sec. Recursos Cinegéticos y Ganaderos, IDR, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha and Animal Science Techniques Applied to Wildlife Management Research Group, Instituto Investigación en Recursos Cinegéticos (IREC), Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha; Ruben Dominguez, Centro Tecnológico de la Carne (CETECA); Miriam Pateiro, Centro Tecnológico de la Carne (CETECA); Maria Lopez-Quintanilla, Sec. Recursos Cinegéticos y Ganaderos, IDR, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha and Animal Science Techniques Applied to Wildlife Management Research Group, Instituto Investigación en Recursos Cinegéticos (IREC), Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha; Tomas Landete-Castillejos, Sec. Recursos Cinegéticos y Ganaderos, IDR, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha and Animal Science Techniques Applied to Wildlife Management Research Group, Instituto Investigación en Recursos Cinegéticos (IREC), Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha

ABSTRACT: Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) is one of the oldest and most expanded (most Asian countries) of the so called “alternative medicines”. The second of its three pillars is the deer, and its most important product is the growing or velvet antler, which was already in use 2200 years ago. This type of medicine would be similar in principles to treatments based on “nutraceutics” in western countries. A nutraceutic is “a kind of food (or part of it) that brings medical benefits or for health, including prevention or treatment of a disease” [1]. There are a number of such benefits recorded by Asian researchers for velvet antler products [2, 3, 4]. It is very likely that such effects are based on the fast growing rate of antlers (1 cm/d; faster than cancer [5]). Such fast growth at biochemical and cellular level, is mediated by growth factors such as IGF-1, EGF, NGF and others [2]. These are more likely to be present or have greater concentrations in the sections close to the tip, which is where the antler grows. Beyond the potential benefits for health, developing products for TCM or western nutraceutics based on velvet antler and other products seem to be an outstanding opportunity for companies in the deer sector throughout the world. Velvet antler tips sell up to 21,000 €/kg in shops in Beijing and lower sections sell up to 4,000-6,000 €/kg (TLC, own experience). Price of nutraceutics based on velvet antler for the western “natural health” market is not much lower: pills made of velvet antler powder sold in internet by companies from New Zealand or Russia have a price around 1200 €/kg [6]. The industrial sector termed “deer pharmaceutical industry” by Chinese is a sector with a turnover of thousands of millions of dollars. The sector is based mostly on the one-million population of deer farmed in China, plus another approximately million deer farmed in NZ, producing about 1100 tons of velvet antler (non-official data suggests that Russia produces another 200 tons). The opportunities are greater for Spain: it is estimated that 650,000 deer are kept in large (1000 ha) game estates, and probably the whole population in Spain exceeds one million [7]. The meat processing industry (also producing other deer products exported frozen and unprocessed to China) in Spain estimates than currently, with few farms, 225,000 deer are shot every year in this country [8]. However, unprocessed frozen velvet antler is sold to China, Korea and other Asian countries by New Zealand at a price around 100 €/kg. Therefore, the greatest benefit rests on processing velvet and other deer products for Asian TCM market. Thus, an innovation project called INCYDEN started at the end of 2016 to assist Spanish industry to develop the technology to produce velvet and other deer products for TCM market, such as deer salami including a small proportion of velvet antler, and to improve the processing of venison for the western market. This poster shows some of the preliminary results of this project: 1) assessing different drying techniques and processing conditions of velvet; 2) efficiency of some treatments to reduce superficial bacterial load in velvet; 3) quantifying the amount of some bioactive components such as IGF-1. One of the aims of the present poster is to attract attention of research groups (particularly from Asia) to establish cooperation.

459037 pdf

Monday August 6, 2018 4:30pm - Friday August 10, 2018 12:00pm
Assembly Hall Foyer